please check out the anti-mandate news »

« prev   random   next »

6
0

Reading Paper Books

By Patrick follow Patrick   2021 Jun 27, 8:34pm 1,080 views   110 comments   watch   nsfw   quote   share    


In my early retirement, I've decided to read at least an hour a night in real paper books. So far, I've read:

- my dad's old college English book (always felt I needed to improve my grammar)
- Candide by Voltaire
- Beyond Good and Evil by Nietzsche
- The Politics by Aristotle

Now I'm reading The Prince by Machiavelli, and really enjoying it. One tip: before invading, look for minorities who will help you because they resent the traditional rulers in their own country. They may in fact invite you in to help them overthrow their own country. This makes me think that the Chinese have read The Prince and are using BLM, gays, and militant feminism as allies in their fight against America.

« First    « Previous    Comments 71 - 110 of 110    Last »

71   stereotomy   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 2, 11:08am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
KgK one says
Side off tract:

Warriner's English Grammar and Composition. Should I get it for My daughters, they will be taking SAT in few years. ? I guess it can help with grammer.


Big issue has been reading comprehension. That's hard to learn, kids been reading tons of books mostly fiction but it might help.
Math I got 800, so helping them with it . One can get 720in 7th grade so I am OK with it


Yes, I would recommend "Warriner's English Grammar and Composition" though the version I have is from 1962. Hopefully it's not changed too much.


It pretty much hasn't changed from the '60's. For that matter, that was the high point of American English; everything else subsequent to this was downhill.

Back before the SAT was PC'd to uselessness, the vocabulary part was chock full of words that used Greek or Latin cognates. All you had to do was memorize about several hundred of these to ace the vocab section.

Interestingly enough, MENSA considers any SAT exam after the early 90's to be invalid proof of IQ. IFAIR, that's when we began the long slide into national and cultural bullshit.
72   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 2, 11:39am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Yes, wokeness has destroyed academic integrity.

Fortunately, it's never entirely over. We can and must fight back against the evil of wokeness.

Wokeness is a religion as harmful to free speech and human progress as medieval Catholicism or Wahhabi Islam. And you know for sure that if the woke get enough power, they will be burning people at the stake and beheading people in public.
73   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 3, 10:23pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Finished The Law by Bastiat. It's very short, only 67 pages in a small format.

His themes:

- The sole purpose of government is to ensure justice, so that no one may plunder or otherwise harm anyone else.
- Taxing some citizens to give to other citizens is still plunder and is unjust.
- Normally, the few plunder the many, using government as their instrument.
- Under communism, everyone is attempting to plunder everyone else at the same time, using government as their instrument.
- Legislators invariably see themselves as superior to the plebeians, who are to them merely clay to be molded according to the legislators' ideals.
- Legislators are not in fact any smarter than other people, and often make truly horrible mistakes with disastrous outcomes.
- When the masses of people expect the government to "give" them things, they tend to revolt when they don't get them.

He's the proto-Libertarian. He would not have the government provide schools because it is unjust to tax people and then have the government decide what will be taught using that tax money. I think I agree on this one. At least I would restrict schools to teaching basics like reading, writing, and math, and leave ideology entirely out of education.

He would not have the government provide anything at all, other than courts and police and military. That seems too far to me. I think public roads are a good idea, for example.
74   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 8, 4:04pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Just finished Going Solo by Roald Dahl, the children's writer. It's about his time before WWII in East Africa, and during WWII as a British fighter pilot.

It was very well written and interesting. Felt like I zipped right through it.

Being an RAF pilot was ridiculously dangerous. About 50% of them died in the war.
75   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 8, 5:35pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
Wokeness is a religion as harmful to free speech and human progress as medieval Catholicism or Wahhabi Islam. And you know for sure that if the woke get enough power, they will be burning people at the stake and beheading people in public.


Notice the flip from "Tolerance for all points of few" to "Deplatform 'hate' speech*, Cancel 'misleading' speech**" in about a decade among the Left.

* Speech I hate
** Speech that leads away from conclusions I prefer.
76   gabbar   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 9, 3:09pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
Finished The Law by Bastiat. It's very short, only 67 pages in a small format.

His themes:

- The sole purpose of government is to ensure justice, so that no one may plunder or otherwise harm anyone else.
- Taxing some citizens to give to other citizens is still plunder and is unjust.
- Normally, the few plunder the many, using government as their instrument.
- Under communism, everyone is attempting to plunder everyone else at the same time, using government as their instrument.
- Legislators invariably see themselves as superior to the plebeians, who are to them merely clay to be molded according to the legislators' ideals.
- Legislators are not in fact any smarter than other people, and often make truly horrible mistakes with disastrous outcomes.
- When the masses of people expect the government to "give" them things, they tend to revolt when they don't get them.

He's the proto-Libertarian. He would not have the government provide schools...


“If the natural tendencies of mankind are so bad that it is not safe to permit people to be free, how is it that the tendencies of these organizers are always good? Do not the legislators and their appointed agents also belong to the human race? Or do they believe that they themselves are made of a finer clay than the rest of mankind?”― Frederic Bastiat, The Law
77   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2021 Aug 9, 5:11pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut says
Hi Patrick is this the one? I saw several different books with that title, just want to get the right one, same one you reading basically.
https://www.amazon.com/Decline-Fall-Roman-Empire/dp/1354279492/



@FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut No, it's this one:



Thank you
78   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 10, 1:15pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Now I'm on to The Wealth of Nations by Adam Smith. Even longer than Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire and much more dense. I'll see how it goes, not promising myself that I can finish it.

Ironically, those two books came out just about the same time, and use the same florid and convoluted English - Edward Gibbon was a fan of The Wealth of Nations!
79   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 15, 9:00pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Good quote from The Wealth of Nations:


It is not, however, difficult to foresee which of the two parties must, upon all ordinary occasions, have the advantage in the dispute, and force the other into a compliance with their terms. The masters, being fewer in number, can combine much more easily: and the law, besides, authorises, or at least does not prohibit, their combinations, while it prohibits those of the workmen. We have no acts of parliament against combining to lower the price of work, but many against combining to raise it. In all such disputes, the masters can hold out much longer. A landlord, a farmer, a master manufacturer, or merchant, though they did not employ a single workman, could generally live a year or two upon the stocks, which they have already acquired. Many workmen could not subsist a week, few could subsist a month, and scarce any a year, without employment. In the long run, the workman may be as necessary to his master as his master is to him; but the necessity is not so immediate.


Relevance to today: the oligarchs can conspire against the rest of us much more easily than the reverse, and they can hold out much longer in any dispute.
80   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 15, 9:10pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Yes, one of my favorite bits of WON - the kind of bits that Free Marketeers like to gloss over.

The most deliberately misrepresented statement in the book:
By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he [every manufacturer] intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain; and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention.

In other words, by pressuring the government to IMPOSE tariffs to help HIS business, the manufacturer does good he does not intend - in his own self-interest to draw more business to himself and AWAY from foreign manufacturers, he creates more wealth and jobs and larger tax bases for fellow Britons. Free Marketeers have long distorted the context of the Invisible Hand to promote preferring Foreign Imported Goods, which reduce jobs and tax bases, if not overall Wealth, when Smith claimed the very OPPOSITE; that Tariffs were Good.

I mention this one because actually reading the WON and coming across this passage was like a slap in the face, back when I was very Free Market. We could never support the Trade Deficit and mass importation we have in place now WITHOUT a fiat currency running on maximum printing speed; we'd be long out of Specie by now.
82   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 15, 10:20pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou says
In other words, by pressuring the government to IMPOSE tariffs to help HIS business, the manufacturer does good he does not intend - in his own self-interest to draw more business to himself and AWAY from foreign manufacturers, he creates more wealth and jobs and larger tax bases for fellow Britons.


Ha! Looking forward to running across this. A good argument to slap those tariffs on cheap Chinese goods.

Booger says
Is Mein Kampf on your list yet?

https://www.cnet.com/news/hitlers-mein-kampf-a-brief-kindle-best-seller/


Yes, and I intend to read it in the original German, otherwise what the hell is my German degree for? I need to find a paper copy in German though.

I also have a copy of Das Kapital in German. I intend to read that too.
83   gabbar   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 16, 5:16am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
In my early retirement, I've decided to read at least an hour a night in real paper books. So far, I've read:

- my dad's old college English book (always felt I needed to improve my grammar)
- Candide by Voltaire
- Beyond Good and Evil by Nietzsche
- The Politics by Aristotle

Now I'm reading The Prince by Machiavelli, and really enjoying it. One tip: before invading, look for minorities who will help you because they resent their current elite. They may in fact invite you in to help them overthrow their own country. This makes me think that the Chinese have read The Prince and are using BLM, gays, and militant feminism as allies in their fight against America.


https://mondopolitico.com/library/thelaw/thelaw2.htm
84   mich   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 16, 7:03am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

On my reading list! so relevant today!
The Rape of the Mind: The Psychology of Thought Control, Menticide, and Brainwashing Paperback – February 25, 2015
by Joost A.M. Meerloo

can add Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
85   Onvacation   ignore (7)   2021 Aug 16, 11:17am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
Booger says
Is Mein Kampf on your list yet?

https://www.cnet.com/news/hitlers-mein-kampf-a-brief-kindle-best-seller/


Yes, and I intend to read it in the original German, otherwise what the hell is my German degree for? I need to find a paper copy in German though.

I picked Mein Kampf up from the library when I was in high school. What a boring book! I think it was one of those books, like Obama's "Dreams of my father", that was not meant to be read but to be bought and put on the shelf to signal your virtue and financially support der Führer.
86   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2021 Aug 16, 11:18am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Google Leaks book - by the whistleblower one is the one I'm planning to read next. Want to know all the evil shit evil empire does inside.
87   FuckCCP89   ignore (6)   2021 Aug 16, 6:49pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Onvacation says
I picked Mein Kampf up from the library when I was in high school. What a boring book! I think it was one of those books, like Obama's "Dreams of my father", that was not meant to be read but to be bought and put on the shelf to signal your virtue and financially support der Führer.


I heard that the most commonly sold English translation is horribly botched (and there is even a conspiracy theory going around that it was intentionally promoted over a better translation).
88   Booger   ignore (6)   2021 Aug 16, 7:09pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Onvacation says
I picked Mein Kampf up from the library when I was in high school. What a boring book!


Yeah, Hitler should have ranted YouTube style in the book. It wouldn't have hurt if he had mentioned skullfucking his enemies a few times as well.
89   komputodo   ignore (3)   2021 Aug 17, 2:32pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

How about reading something a little more enjoyable...LINCOLN by Gore Vidal...The Journeyer by Gary Jennings (about Marco polo)....Shogun by James Clavell....or Jack London's collection. Maybe try Michael Lewis,,,,,,,Liars Poker about the people who came up with the idea of monetizing mortgages back in the 80s.
90   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 17, 3:37pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

I did read Liar's Poker way back when.
91   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 17, 3:47pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

komputodo says
Shogun by James Clavell


Strongly second this recommendation.
92   komputodo   ignore (3)   2021 Aug 18, 2:39pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Jack London short stories,,,,To Build A Fire and A Piece Of Steak,,,seems to me that the movie Cinderella Man was loosely based on the latter.
93   komputodo   ignore (3)   2021 Aug 18, 2:42pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

The Man Who Lives with Wolves
by Shaun Ellis,
94   Onvacation   ignore (7)   2021 Aug 22, 1:02am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

For well researched novels, read Michener's books.
Alaska
Tales of the South Pacific
The Source
Chesapeake
Hawaii
and many others.
95   Automan Empire   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 22, 7:11am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

richwicks says
Rules for Radicals is a particularly hated book that I was told was filled with horrifically immoral, dastardly devious advice. The simple truth is, there's a lot of people that don't want you to read it.


I've been saying this to deaf ears for a long time. The book was mostly forgotten till Obama mentioned it and a couple of authors even rewrote it for modern conservative readers around the time Occupy Wall Street was kicking off. I've seen a lot of people criticize the book, usually to the depth of using the title and author as pejoratives, but never have I seen a critique that addresses even a single sentence of the book's actual content. One of the key concepts has become ever more relevant as the middle class is squeezed out. People are polarized into binary categories of haves and have-nots. A lot of working people consider themselves "Haves" and assume the "Have-nots" are their mortal enemies. However, Alinsky points out that many hardworking folks are in a category of "Have a little, want more" thus have much more in common with the have-nots, yet are conditioned to treat them as mortal enemies while fellating the actual "Haves" who are systematically dismantling their way of life with the "Have-a-littles'" active and eager participation.
96   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Aug 22, 7:35am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Automan Empire says
I've been saying this to deaf ears for a long time. The book was mostly forgotten till Obama mentioned it and a couple of authors even rewrote it for modern conservative readers around the time Occupy Wall Street was kicking off. I've seen a lot of people criticize the book, usually to the depth of using the title and author as pejoratives, but never have I seen a critique that addresses even a single sentence of the book's actual content.


It's wonderful, it's how the Left took over with those tactics. That's why Community Organizer instead of the more traditional/widespread "Agitator" or "Political Activist" was used as a job title.

Making your enemy live up to his own standards is a good one.

That's why I think everybody should be chalking slogans and watch the local DA, including alleged "Republican" ones pursue charges with ferocity, while the ACLU that defended BLM/Antifa Vandalism, Arson, and Rioting under the "Speech and Protest" rubric refuses to acknowledge somebody is being overcharged with multiple crimes for chalking "Biden Illegit" on a Wall or Sidwalk.
97   Onvacation   ignore (7)   2021 Aug 22, 9:14am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Automan Empire says


I've been saying this to deaf ears for a long time

Well said.
98   komputodo   ignore (3)   2021 Aug 27, 8:24am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

I just finished Jack London's WHITE FANG. A great short story about a wolf/dog through its eyes. They made 2 movies based on it. One with Ethan Hawke.
99   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Aug 27, 9:10am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

komputodo says
I just finished Jack London's WHITE FANG. A great short story about a wolf/dog through its eyes. They made 2 movies based on it. One with Ethan Hawke.


His books were pretty good, also great reads for the kiddos to redpill them. London would look in disgust about the leftoid retard snowflake mess the US, and specifically CA (Glen Ellen) where he built his lodge, has become. Based.
100   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Aug 27, 10:43am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Yes, I loved White Fang when I was in middle school. Great book.
101   komputodo   ignore (3)   2021 Aug 27, 2:17pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Onvacation says
For well researched novels, read Michener's books.
Alaska
Tales of the South Pacific
The Source
Chesapeake
Hawaii
and many others.

Great author...Great books.
102   komputodo   ignore (3)   2021 Aug 27, 2:24pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Lets not forget about John Steinbeck.....All his stories about CA especially The Grapes Of Wrath, Of Mice and Men, and Cannery Row.
103   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Sep 5, 9:34pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Ran across a brilliant passage in The Wealth of Nations, where he talks about merchants (whom he calls "dealers") and regulations:

The interest of the dealers, however, in any particular branch of trade or manufactures, is
always in some respects different from and even opposite to, that of the public. To widen
the market and to narrow the competition is always in the interests of the dealers. To widen
the market may frequently be agreeable enough to the interest of the public; but to narrow
the competition must always be against it, and can serve only to enable the dealers, by
raising their profits above what they naturally would be, to levy, for their own benefit, an
absurd tax upon the rest of the their fellow citizens. The proposal of any new law or
regulation of commerce which comes from this order ought always be listened to with
great precaution, and ought never to be adopted till after having been long and carefully
examined, not only with the most scrupulous, but with the most suspicious attention. It
comes form an order of men whose interest is never exactly the same with that of the pubic,
who have generally an interest Ito deceive and even to oppress the public, and who
accordingly have, upon many occasions, both deceived and oppressed it.


And of course I think of the current corrupt Big Phama/government complex "widening the market" for the jab by making it mandatory, and in the process deceiving and oppressing the public, when a simple dose of Ivermectin is likely to be more effective and far cheaper.
104   mell   ignore (6)   2021 Sep 5, 9:41pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Perfectly sums up the current situation
105   GesslersHut   ignore (0)   2021 Sep 6, 2:56am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Hi Patrick,
In case you want to read something in German, Eugen Richter, a German politician wrote 1890 a dystopian novel. "Zukunftsbilder des Sozialismus"
a warning against state control and any kind of Socialsm. Maybe Germans should have read it instead of Mein K(r)ampf (Krampf is also a slang word for nonsense). Richter completely nailed any kind of socialistic nightmare which would happen in the 20th century, people thought he was crazy
Here is the English translation of Richters book:
https://mises-media.s3.amazonaws.com/Pictures%20of%20the%20Socialistic%20Future_Vol_2_2.pdf
106   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Sep 11, 6:58pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Reading the great book "Rubicon" by Holland.

He properly starts it with Marius vs. Sulla, most accounts start with the Cataline Conspiracy or the Triumverate. Sulla was the first revolutionary - in the sense he came to power by force rather than first a Senate nomination - Dictator.

Anyway, here's what the Romans believed was at threat during the last century of the Republic:

* Women were naturally sensual and given to pleasure first - hence their omission from all leadership.
* High Cuisine was decadent, too much luxury foods were coming to Rome.
* Dandyism was decadent. Plain dress was right and proper; too much oriental fashion was coming to Rome.
* There were too many passive, feminine males.
* There were too many "Publicans" - or Corporate Bosses and Bankers, squeezing and corrupting the system.
107   Ceffer   ignore (6)   2021 Sep 11, 7:04pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou says
Reading the great book "Rubicon" by Holland.


LOL! Just substitute 'MKULTRA' for the lead poisoning form the utensils of the Roman elite, and you can see where things headed.
108   Patrick   ignore (1)   2021 Sep 11, 11:03pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

I ran across an interesting statement by Adam Smith in The Wealth of Nations to the effect that the risk-adjusted returns of stock and the general interest rate must necessarily be approximately equal. If, say, there were more money to be made in stock than in lending, people would borrow to invest in stock, driving up the price of stock (and thus lowering its return in the future) and creating demand for loans, which would drive up interest rates. And this would continue until the two kinds of returns equalized.

But at the present, there is clearly much more money to be made in stock than in lending. So you would think that people would borrow to invest in the stock market.

Hmmm, maybe they are doing exactly that, but interest rates are held artificially low by the Fed's lending at extremely low rates. So the Fed is in effect subsidizing the stock market.
109   HeadSet   ignore (3)   2021 Sep 12, 6:44am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
So the Fed is in effect subsidizing the stock market.

Yes, low rates subsidize both stocks and housing. Haven't you noticed that the biggest fans of the Fed keeping rates low are stock brokers and realtors?
110   MisdemeanorRebellionNoCoupForYou   ignore (0)   2021 Sep 12, 9:51am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Patrick says
Hmmm, maybe they are doing exactly that, but interest rates are held artificially low by the Fed's lending at extremely low rates. So the Fed is in effect subsidizing the stock market.


Yep. I had a friend who got a 0% interest Credit Card and did just that.

« First    « Previous    Comments 71 - 110 of 110    Last »


about   best comments   contact   one year ago   suggestions