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Americans Should Stop Funding Racial Quotas

By cmdrda2leak follow cmdrda2leak   2019 Feb 25, 7:21am 1,422 views   31 comments   watch   nsfw   quote   share    


These institutions are accepting federal money while violating the Civil Rights Act of 1964. They bury the discriminatory legerdemain behind subjective criteria and use euphemisms to sugar coat the reality of their racial quotas. Post-racial America should cut them off from the funding teat.

From PragerU:


Can you imagine, in this day and age, an educational institution discriminating against a racial minority? Can you imagine what the outcry would be?

You mean, you're preventing these qualified students from attending your college because of the color of their skin?!"

Well, you don't have to imagine it. It's happening. And at arguably the most prestigious college in America--my alma mater, Harvard.

The ethnic minority isn't blacks or Jews, as it was in years past. The target this time is Asian Americans.

And it's just as wrong.

After millions of dollars in legal fees, millions of records examined, and hundreds of hours of depositions and testimony, Harvard's once purposely opaque admissions policies have been laid bare. It's not a pretty picture.

Here's what we now know:

Harvard Admissions rates student applicants in three main ways: 1) Academic performance; 2) Extra-curricular achievements; 3) "Personal qualities." That's fine, as far as it goes, if the criteria were applied fairly. But they're not.

Asian American applicants consistently score higher in the first two criteria--academics and extra-curricular activities, which can be objectively assessed--than white students, Latinos and African Americans.

So how does Harvard justify its Asian American quota? With the help of category three--"personal qualities," which include vague and largely subjective factors like "likability," "maturity," "integrity," and "effervescence."

According to Harvard's own internal reports, Asian American applicants are routinely and systematically marked much lower on this personality scale by Harvard admissions officers who almost never meet or interview applicants. But here's the kicker: the personality ratings given to Asian students by admissions officers are vastly different than the personality ratings Harvard gets from its own alumni interviewers, who actually meet the applicants in person. Alumni interviewers score Asian applicants as high as whites.

In other words, Harvard artificially and fraudulently downgrades Asians on "personality" to get the results it wants. And what Harvard wants is to suppress the number of Asian Americans admitted.

Based on the data that Harvard was forced to turn over, economist Peter Arcidiacono of Duke University concluded that with the same application profile in terms of test scores, extracurricular activities and personality factors, an Asian American male applicant would only have a 25% chance of admission--versus 32% if white, 77% if Hispanic, and 95% if black.

What's the real-life result of all this?

In 2013, Asian Americans made up 19% of the incoming freshmen class. According to Harvard's own Office of Institutional Research, if the personality factors had not been rigged, that percentage would have been 43%.

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 guarantees that "No person in the United States shall, on the ground of race, color or national origin, be excluded from participation in, or be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance."

Each year, Harvard takes hundreds of millions of dollars from the federal government.

In Grutter v. Bollinger, the Supreme Court upheld the University of Michigan Law School's affirmative action policies, deciding that race could be used as a "plus factor" to achieve diversity, but never as a quota. Yet, by placing strict limits on the percentage of Asian American applicants it will admit, racial quotas are exactly what Harvard is using.

One strongly suspects this quota system isn't limited to Harvard. In the last ten years, Asian American students have been limited to an 18-22% presence across the Ivy League. Or maybe that's just a coincidence.

Writing for the majority in Grutter v. Bollinger in 2003, Justice Sandra Day O'Connor wrote that the Court "expects that 25 years from now, the use of racial preferences will no longer be necessary to further the interest approved today."

With less than a decade to go, the Ivy League shows no indication that it's giving up on those racial preferences. Instead, these colleges have doubled down. Objective standards regarding admissions continue to be increasingly disfavored as the illegal goal of racial balancing is advanced. This racial balancing is justified by the left's desire to achieve "racial diversity"--its insistence on seeing every person only through the prism of race, as if the most important thing any of us has to offer is the color of our skin.

Not long ago, that was called "racism." It's still called racism.

It needs to end, once and for all--for the sake of deserving Asian American students, for the sake of Harvard's own integrity, and for the sake of the American principle that the rules must be the same for everyone.

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court John Roberts said it best: "The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race is to stop discriminating on the basis of race."

It's time we did just that. I'm Lee Cheng, of the Asian American Legal Foundation, for Prager University.


1   Patrick   ignore (1)   2019 Feb 25, 8:02am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

cmdrdataleak says
Not long ago, that was called "racism." It's still called racism.


Well, Asians have to be made to pay the price for slavery, right?

That's the same reasoning used to exclude whites in preference to blacks.
2   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 25, 9:22am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

But I am told that only ORANGEMANBAD and Fucking White Males are racist..
3   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2019 Feb 25, 9:24am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Education should just be online. University system is crap, it’s too expensive, shitty results, and it totally ensnares people with debt.

As old Patrick.net sticker stated:
Debt Is Slavery!

Btw Patrick do you still sell those? I got a new truck.
4   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 25, 9:27am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneIndiana says
Education should just be online.

Ain't gonna work for anything other than computers. Try chemistry, physics, or chemical engineering online, especially labs. Companies hire students who have research and lab experience, not experience of cheating online (how do you know who took the online tests?)
FortWayneIndiana says
University system is crap, it’s too expensive, shitty results, and it totally ensnares people with debt.

That part is true.
5   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2019 Feb 25, 9:47am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

I originally went into chemistry.

They can sell small lab kits, those experiments we did back in college weren’t that sophisticated. It can be done.

That gets you Bachelors. For masters you need residency, but that’s just internship.

d6rB says
FortWayneIndiana says
Education should just be online.

Ain't gonna work for anything other than computers. Try chemistry, physics, or chemical engineering online, especially labs. Companies hire students who have research and lab experience, not experience of cheating online (how do you know who took the online tests?)
FortWayneIndiana says
University system is crap, it’s too expensive, shitty results, and it totally ensnares people with debt.

That part is true.
6   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 25, 9:59am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneIndiana says
They can sell small lab kits, those experiments we did back in college weren’t that sophisticated. It can be done.

Good luck with doing something like this at your home: https://www.bc.edu/content/dam/bc1/schools/mcas/Chemistry/pdf/undergrad/lab-courses/org/spring/Stilbene.pdf

You will be hauled off to Guantanamo in a nanosecond.

Furthermore, I have and will never hire anyone who has done any part of education online. How do I know that his friend did not pass exams for him?
7   Al_Sharpton_for_President   ignore (6)   2019 Feb 25, 10:01am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

The devious racist white man designs a system that holds back black and brown people, but yet favors Asians above white peoples. Devious.
8   MisdemeanorRebel   ignore (3)   2019 Feb 25, 10:03am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

You go to the lab every week for a day. Everywhere there are community colleges with chem labs as well. There could also be satellite college offices where you can pay, do lab work, have speakers, etc. Great use for abandoned malls.

Online is the future. There should actually be incentives passed for business to have employees at home after the first 90 days of employment if it's an office job and the company has more than 50 employees. At first, businesses get a tax break, then if they don't do it they pay a penalty. With Skype, Messaging, Email, there's no more excuse. It is the future the 50s dreamed of. And for standardizing Eenglesh speleeng, too. And Metric System.

The impact on infrastructure, traffic, (oil) imports, etc. would be substantial. Bad time to be in commercial real estate, though. Would save billions in wear and tear and oil imports. Good time to invest in office furniture and deluxe home coffee machines.
9   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 25, 10:13am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

MisterLearnToCode says
You go to the lab every week for a day. Everywhere there are community colleges with chem labs as well. There could also be satellite college offices where you can pay, do lab work, have speakers, etc. Great use for abandoned malls.

I have yet to meet a person who has taken online courses and has not cheated in those courses.
About community colleges, 60% of people who take intro courses there fail at university when taking intermediate level courses. If they took same intro courses at a university, failure rate is 20%. Most people do not learn anything at community colleges.
As it stands now, at least in fields I am familiar with, both online courses and community colleges are worthless. May be they are OK in computer sciences, but I am not familiar with that.
10   MisdemeanorRebel   ignore (3)   2019 Feb 25, 10:18am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

d6rB says
As it stands now, at least in fields I am familiar with, both online courses and community colleges are worthless. May be they are OK in computer sciences, but I am not familiar with that.



You definitely raise some concerns, and we definitely need to change some things. Some ideas:

* Emphasize rhetorical tests, rather than multiple choice/written work. In other words, you have to get on Skype, go to a test center, or go in person to the College Office and give a spiel about Plato, or the laws of Thermodynamics, to the professor or grad student as part of the final. This is actually more in keeping with Plato's Academy and Western Civ, and all degree candidates used to have such oral exams in the past.
* Shorter written prose assignments.
* For programming, this is nothing, and copypasta code is part and parcel of being a programmer anyway. At the very least you have to know what to employ and how to customize it.
* For Chemistry, again the satellite test center/labs.

The best course I ever took was a statistics class where I had to stand up in front of the professor and discuss 3 concepts I learned during the semester for the final. Impossible to cheat, difficult to BS through, and in some ways more forgiving (I forgot the name of one stat term but I described it 100% accurately, so the Prof gave me a break)

It's also easier for the Professor: Instead of wading through 5 mostly BS pages of pap, he can tell pretty quick whether you goofed or cheated through the course in about a minute of your spiel. So in 2 and a half hours he's done with grading.
11   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 25, 10:24am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

MisterLearnToCode says
* Emphasize rhetorical tests, rather than multiple choice/written work. In other words, you have to get on Skype, go to a test center, or go in person to the College Office and give a spiel about Plato, or the laws of Thermodynamics, to the professor or grad student as part of the final.
* Shorter written prose assignments.

I never give multiple choice questions and students hate not having them.
WRT to skype or other face time programs, they do it sometimes but students still manage to cheat (second computer open in background with another person answering etc.
Written prose assignments - I am ambivalent. They come out of University not knowing how to write, so forcing them to write would actually be helpful if the class was small and they would get individualized attention.
I also think that at tender age of 18-20, and being spoiled as they are, students need to be forced to go to class and study. If left on their own devices, 98% will not learn at all. MOOC's failed miserably for that reason.
12   MisdemeanorRebel   ignore (3)   2019 Feb 25, 10:29am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

d6rB says
I also think that at tender age of 18-20, and being spoiled as they are, students need to be forced to go to class and study. If left on their own devices, 98% will not learn at all. MOOC's failed miserably for that reason.



I learned alot from MOOCs, especially the alternative energy MOOC from UC Davis. Shit doesn't scale, storage a major problem, even covered Jabothora or whatever that plant was they were hyping 10 years ago as plant-based fuel.

My attitude is, they don't give a shit, FAIL THEM. EXPEL THEM. America is a can-do, self-motivating country. Fail enough of the bastards and they'll toughen up and be grateful of the opportunity and be more serious before they flunk out and get expelled. I'm in favor of self-guided work because it shows whether somebody has gumption or passion, or is just looking for a rubber stamp so they can foist their lazy/incompetent ass on some employer. College shouldn't be a nanny, but an opportunity to learn. If you're going to be an 18-year old wise ass, not do your work, and expect a C you can see yourself out the program.

Shit, colleges used to expel failing students or put them on probation conditional of passing certain classes all the time, and not so far in the ancient past, either.

Let them come back in a few years after flipping burgers on a conditional basis that they get B's or better in the courses they failed.
13   Rin   ignore (8)   2019 Feb 25, 4:46pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

cmdrdataleak says
the sake of Harvard's own integrity


What are you talking about? Let's talk about a famous Harvard alumni ... yes, Al Gore Jr, former VP of the United States, son of Al Gore Sr, senator of Tennessee.

Junior graduated Harvard College with mediocre grades but what's more significant was that he failed all his finals at Vanderbilt Law School. Still, the dean of the law program asked Senator Gore Sr, if Junior could submit a term paper, so that the school could pass him. Junior, being the lazy shit that he was, didn't even do that, and thus, is a law school flunky.

So why did Harvard admit a person who couldn't even pass his first year of law school? Isn't "everyone" at Harvard a person with Goethe's IQ and some photographic memory?

Nevertheless, Gore Jr later became senator of Tennessee, in his dad's footsteps, and finally, Vice President of the United States. So you see, it has little to do with true merit, it's about connections and what one can do for the school's brand name. Being a Fortunate Son makes that very likely and thus, Ivy Colleges want these ppl, over hard working Asian-Americans from working families.
14   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2019 Feb 25, 4:53pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

You should never hire just because they graduated anything.

I’ve seen too many graduates who can’t do shit, and they had masters even at times.

It’s strange times man, but I think degrees are meaningless these days outside med.

d6rB says
Furthermore, I have and will never hire anyone who has done any part of education online. How do I know that his friend did not pass exams for him?
15   MisdemeanorRebel   ignore (3)   2019 Feb 25, 5:24pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Interestingly, if you want to know why businesses, especially Media and Marketing, are making such resounding missteps, consider that big Coasty Companies look down on people with Dairy Queen or Painting Houses as job experience during/before college. They want to see (unpaid) internships that only wealthy students can afford to take.

Meaning they end up with rich dummies with no real world experience beyond their Lefty Coastie Enclaves.
16   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2019 Feb 25, 6:18pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

I think so too. They want rich chums, not smart with potential.

Mission is to charge lots, not to educate.

MisterLearnToCode says
Interestingly, if you want to know why businesses, especially Media and Marketing, are making such resounding missteps, consider that big Coasty Companies look down on people with Dairy Queen or Painting Houses as job experience during/before college. They want to see (unpaid) internships that only wealthy students can afford to take.

Meaning they end up with rich dummies with no real world experience beyond their Lefty Coastie Enclaves.
17   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 25, 6:25pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneIndiana says
You should never hire just because they graduated anything.

I’ve seen too many graduates who can’t do shit, and they had masters even at times.

It’s strange times man, but I think degrees are meaningless these days outside med.

My students with degrees are hired well by local oil and gas industries. And we are not a lefty enclave in CA, we do have capitalism here - these companies hire those students because they will profit from employing them - apparently hiring random people off the street or hiring students form community colleges does not work. I have also not seen them hiring anyone who has graduated from online universities. At least in my field, the old way of doing things works.

WRT to people not being able to do anything after graduating - that is byproduct of schools becoming money-sucking machines instead of places of research and education. Everyone deserves to pass so that we can increase diversity office staff to 500 and pay Chief Diversity Officer 500K!
18   Rin   ignore (8)   2019 Feb 26, 8:15pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

d6rB says
I have also not seen them hiring anyone who has graduated from online universities.


FYI, both Penn State and Univ of Maryland have online campuses now, so yes, online will take off but they need to have a brick/mortar base for it to work. The days of Univ of Phoenix are over.
19   FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut   ignore (4)   2019 Feb 26, 8:40pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

d6rB says
My students with degrees are hired well by local oil and gas industries. And we are not a lefty enclave in CA, we do have capitalism here - these companies hire those students because they will profit from employing them - apparently hiring random people off the street or hiring students form community colleges does not work. I have also not seen them hiring anyone who has graduated from online universities. At least in my field, the old way of doing things works.


What state are you in? I'm generally interested. What coast/state are colleges you see folks from who know their stuff?

Out here, literally, too many people graduate knowing 0, literally they know nothing with their degrees. Hard to find good people. It's pathetic out here in California. Bachelors/Masters, don't matter. It's as if colleges are handing out degrees for attendance, not knowledge. I really suspect that case.

We'd hire a guy, he can't do the job, but has a Masters degree. And you just wonder about those people, wtf were they doing to get that degree. I've also seen people who graduated High School, and couldn't do arithmetic well (i'm talking basic multiplication shit like 12x5). Something is very wrong with education out here, very expensive, and very very bad.
20   just_passing_through   ignore (7)   2019 Feb 26, 9:29pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

He's in TX. In/near Houston I think.
21   just_passing_through   ignore (7)   2019 Feb 26, 9:30pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Mid-90s I knew hiring managers in Silicon Valley tech companies that wouldn't hire California grads. One in particular recruited from Georgia Tech.
22   NDrLoR   ignore (1)   2019 Feb 26, 9:40pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneIndiana says
also seen people who graduated High School, and couldn't do arithmetic well (i'm talking basic multiplication shit like 12x5)
The main reason my late friend retired in 2000 after teaching 28 years on the community college level. He taught business and basic accounting and during the last five years of his tenure, students coming out of high school with good grades couldn't do simple computations. That made their progress in accounting impossible. If he spent extra time getting them up to speed, the semester would be over and it just got to be not worth it. When his age and years of service added up to the required number, he threw in the towel. I don't imagine things have improved in the intervening 20 years, either.
23   HeadSet   ignore (2)   2019 Feb 27, 7:26am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

At least in my field, the old way of doing things works.

I presume that includes some professional certifications. Certifications that require a certain level of education and experience, plus successful completion of a rigorous exam.
24   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 27, 8:26am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneIndiana says
What state are you in? I'm generally interested. What coast/state are colleges you see folks from who know their stuff?

Out here, literally, too many people graduate knowing 0, literally they know nothing with their degrees. Hard to find good people. It's pathetic out here in California. Bachelors/Masters, don't matter. It's as if colleges are handing out degrees for attendance, not knowledge. I really suspect that case.

@FortWayneIndiana - I am in SE Texas - we have lots of oil industry and they need people in our specialty.

I think a lot of misconceptions in online vs. not online arises from fact that most people on Patnet are computer scientists. Online in computer sciences makes sense. Online in chemistry, physics, and engineering does not. When companies come to us, they specifically want BS and MS students with research experience in some research group. Just a plain BS may work, but getting a job will be more difficult. My last student had 10 interviews and 8 offers because he had research experience, and he is a (local) Fucking Asian male which is a minus. Spending time in lab makes sure that advisor (me) knows student very well, that students works hard (lazy ones will not survive), and that students understand realities of life - they don't get paid because of their personality, but because they produce. Students who went through research also will not set plant on fire. Basically, companies that have hired from me once will keep hiring if people I recommend them do well, and they do. It is surprising how easy it is to talk common sense into young people, and it is also surprising how most of them completely lack understanding how world works. I can not have more than 5 MS/BS students in my group, and that experience can not be replicated online in any way.

With respect to which schools to hire from, it is not easy to answer. I'd say it is a risk always unless you know professor for whom student worked for. In general, students hired from blue-collar type large state schools which do not inflate grades will give you individuals who have common sense. But then again grades not always correlate with work ethic - some people are just naturally good at taking exams. My last two successful students had GPA below 3.0 but they are doing very well in companies - they are extremely conscientious, have tons of common sense, and come from poor local families (meaning will work hard). Hiring from small, elite private schools will often give you mentally damaged SJW's - they get passed because they pay $60K tuition and scream ORANGEMANBAD. Then again, it might give you a genius.

HeadSet says
I presume that includes some professional certifications. Certifications that require a certain level of education and experience, plus successful completion of a rigorous exam.

Some of that is there (thesis defense, various intermediate exams), but most of it is judgement of advisor. Companies call you up and ask "do you think student will be successful with us". If you place one who sucks, good luck placing next one.
25   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 27, 8:31am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneIndiana says
I've also seen people who graduated High School, and couldn't do arithmetic well (i'm talking basic multiplication shit like 12x5). Something is very wrong with education out here, very expensive, and very very bad.

I see that all the time in my classes. I do not pass them, but I suspect that adjuncts (non-tenured lecturers) pass them.
26   NDrLoR   ignore (1)   2019 Feb 27, 9:34am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

d6rB says
I see that all the time in my classes
I think remediation is a huge thing in colleges today, used to be something like 40% of incoming freshmen, but may be higher by now.
27   Rb6d   ignore (0)   2019 Feb 27, 9:47am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

P N Dr Lo R says
I think remediation is a huge thing in colleges today,

It has gone from remediation attempts to forcing faculty to pass students who have not learned anything. Collecting as much tuition as possible while giving (and asking) little in terms of knowledge is a SACRAMENT!
28   SunnyvaleCA   ignore (1)   2019 Feb 27, 1:42pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

willywonka says
The devious racist white man designs a system that holds back black and brown people, but yet favors Asians above white peoples. Devious.

It's a well-hidden secret that the Founding Fathers were Koreans. They rigged the constitution and original federal laws of the country to favor themselves. That's why, of all the immigrants that come to the USA, Koreans are the most successful.

Now, because you are smart enough to read Pat Net, you also know this little secret! Shhhhh... Don't tell anyone.
29   zzyzzx   ignore (2)   2020 Dec 17, 11:56am     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

Does this mean I can get preforential treatment now?

30   richwicks   ignore (4)   2020 Dec 17, 12:31pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

FortWayneAsNancyPelosiHaircut says
've also seen people who graduated High School, and couldn't do arithmetic well (i'm talking basic multiplication shit like 12x5)


This must be the fault of common core. Look, it's just the associative property

12 5 =
(10 + 2)
5 =
50 + 10 =
60

You only need to know your times tables to to 10. The old plug and chug method of multiplication and shifting with a carry is nothing but a method of carrying out the associative property. You can literally teach it in a day. Anybody that understands the associative property can learn the method is a few minutes.

My sister is an engineer. Her kids were being taught Common Core, and they were having trouble with algebra. She was appalled but taught them in a few minutes how you can multiply and divide large numbers. Took her under an hour with her kid.

Public education is designed to waste children's time and to PREVENT them from learning. I once taught them arbitrary base systems. First you show them you have 10 symbols in base 10. Point out that is an arbitrary decision then show them how to take base 2 base 7 base 12 base 16 to represent the same number. Base 12 is actually useful in mathematics - I can't say I remember why it is, but there's been some convincing arguments made. Point is moot today with a calculator.
31   Eric Holder   ignore (0)   2020 Dec 17, 12:35pm     ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag      

zzyzzx says
Does this mean I can get preforential treatment now?



It totally does if you have the required heritage! I woud go as far as saying that everybody should be entitled to preferential treatment because it's 99.99999% certain that some of their ancestors were treated unfairly some time in the past.

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