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I'm Leaving California

By NuttBoxer following x   2019 Jan 23, 11:18am 4,595 views   113 comments   watch   nsfw   quote     share    


Getting on that outta state bandwagon. Despite making good money, and keeping my rent level for the past two years we are tighter than ever. I accepted a job in Phoenix, partly for the 30% decrease in cost-of-living, partly to stay within a drive-able distance of friends and relatives in San Diego. I had always assumed a six figure salary would mean I'd made it when I was younger, even if it was low six figures. That is no longer the case in California. Sick of seeing all my money go out as quickly as it comes in. I'd love to come back sometime in the future if prices ever go back to something remotely normal, but great weather and the ocean just aren't enough anymore.

I've always preached live within your means, this is me making the hard decision and practicing it. If you rent you are always one move away from getting back on track.

Debt is Slavery!

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41   clambo   ignore (4)   2019 Jan 25, 5:55am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I'm not an expert on Florida since I have never been around much. But here's what I can say I've seen so far.

The spot I like is where Tiger Woods, Bobby Orr, Joe Namath, Greg Norman, Michael Jordan, McElroy and others live. They are at the northern border of Palm Beach County or into Martin County.

The TV news guys call places by "coast"; just north of Palm Beach county is called "the treasure coast" (Spanish ships sank off the beach), farther north to Cape Canaveral is "space coast".

Both of these areas are nice; however the ocean water is much bluer and clearer in Palm Beach and Martin County as the Gulf Stream passes out to sea as you go northward on the coast. See the map of Florida and there it bulges out to the east is where the Gulf Stream is hitting the coast. The gulf stream is a constant current of clear, warm blue water.

This makes the scuba diving very good because it's fairly productive off the coast with lots of game fish swimming, lots of turtles, sharks, etc. to see in addition to those pretty aquarium fish.

Fishing is excellent and Stuart FL is called the "sailfish capital of the world". I don't want one but they are out there in addition to other game fish.

Guys who have the dough (and there are tons of them) drive small boats over to the Bahamas in just a few hours when the water is flat which is often.

The negative is that people are flocking to Florida's East coast from New York, New Jersey, CT , Boston and you hear the accents and see Yankees hats, Red Sox hats, gold chains, Patriots jerseys, etc. around. The others flocking to the area are Haitians, Jamaicans, Cubans, Colombians, and Guatemalans.

The food choices are vastly superior to Santa Cruz CA, it's not even close. The service you receive is also vastly superior; I am treated kindly by everyone I do any business with.

I have heard some good things about Florida's Gulf Coast but the Gulf is not going to be as blue and the summers will be hotter, but the immigrants there are reported to be from the midwest so nicer to be around them maybe.

If you are a male chauvinist pig there are some more choices for females in Florida too; lots of divorcees and others who may forgive you being older are running around.
42   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Feb 22, 10:38am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

So my first week here I enjoyed ice on my windshield(I'm now parking in the garage), and snow on the surrounding mountains on my drive into work. The last was pretty, and really enjoying the beauty sky's out here.

Also I've noticed that major east/west streets act as mini-freeways with speed limits of 40-45mph, and most people driving 10 miles over. So despite living on the West side and commuting to Scottsdale, I never have to spend more than 45 minutes in traffic.
43   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 6:27am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

“A Tale of Two States”: Phoenix a hot market for Nebraskans

When Fremont (NEBRASKA) native Bart Mruz settled down in Phoenix, Arizona, he didn’t expect that so many of his fellow Nebraskans would follow.

Mruz is a real estate agent in Phoenix for the brokerage Realty Executives. As part of his job, he specializes in helping people from his home state to buy and sell property in his adopted state.

And the market is hot, Mruz said. On average, he sees 20 to 25 purchases per month from the eastern Nebraska area. He knows about 30 people from Fremont that have purchased property there.

“I call it a tale of two states,” he said. “You’d be shocked, especially on Cornhusker game days, how many people are down here at the bars. There’s a huge presence.”

The trend is so palpable, that in 2014, he started marketing his properties back here in Nebraska. He comes back frequently to meet with people and work on marketing, and his brokerage cooperates with several here in town, referring business back and forth.

It’s not just Nebraska, either. Mruz sees a growing market from other Midwestern states, too, particularly in Iowa, Minnesota and Illinois.

There’s a number of reasons why midwesterners, and Nebraskans in particular, are drawn to Phoenix, Mruz says. The weather is a big part of it.

“This time of year, you can just look out your window [in Nebraska] the last couple days and figure out why,” Mruz said.

But also, the Phoenix area offers affordable options, compared to the surrounding areas of other popular cities to settle in, like San Diego or Los Angeles or Las Vegas. And it’s only a few hours from those cities. And the housing taxes are “about a third to a half” of what they are back in Nebraska, Mruz said.

Phoenix also offers a growing city with a vibrant downtown and more than 200 golf courses. Hiking and other outdoor activity is popular.

“Now that the city has grown and we have an active downtown and the median age keeps getting younger and younger here, the city is really cool,” Mruz said. “I mean it’s evolved and it’s grown and it’s dynamic. It’s got a vibe.”

For Nebraskans, one of the most popular areas is the city of Scottsdale, not far from Phoenix. Mruz describes it as a dynamic neighborhood.

“It’s gorgeous,” he said.

Mruz sells properties for both part-time and full-time living, and he’s seeing an explosion in second-home ownership in the area, where people are buying properties outside of their primary home. He notes that the Nebraska crowd gets younger and younger every year. More are buying properties condominiums and townhomes, as well as zero-lot properties -- like a single-family home on a small lot with a small yard.

“In the last, I would say, five to 10 years especially, it’s just exploded,” he said. “You’ve got people buying second or third properties down here.”

When Mruz moved to Phoenix, he didn’t quite expect to see so many of his fellow Nebraskans there.

He grew up in Fremont, the son of a local builder, and had an interest in houses and construction from an early age. As a kid, he’d go with his dad on Saturdays to building sites to help out. He’d spend his time in class doodling floor plans.

Mruz went to school for journalism and was originally planning to pursue a writing career. One Friday afternoon in September 2001, he was meeting with an executive at ABC about the possibility of writing for the Drew Carey Show. But the following day was September 11. The studios went on lockdown and Mruz became leery of big city life. So he decided to stay in Phoenix and pursue real estate.

“Gradually, I started bumping into people that I knew back in Omaha, and then I started watching, and it kind of snowballed every year,” Mruz said.

https://fremonttribune.com/business/local/a-tale-of-two-states-phoenix-a-hot-market-for/article_a8d80205-cb90-50cf-96ed-e7d494b6ea8c.html
44   CBOEtrader   ignore (5)   2019 Mar 8, 7:18am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

FortWayneIndiana says
Was thinking of going back to Indiana, but couldn't convince the Mrs.


Tbf, Indiana is as boring as a state can get. Low cost of living though sure. You can pick up a corn field farmhouse for peanuts
45   CBOEtrader   ignore (5)   2019 Mar 8, 7:22am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
So my first week here I enjoyed ice on my windshield(I'm now parking in the garage), and snow on the surrounding mountains on my drive into work. The last was pretty, and really enjoying the beauty sky's out here.

Also I've noticed that major east/west streets act as mini-freeways with speed limits of 40-45mph, and most people driving 10 miles over. So despite living on the West side and commuting to Scottsdale, I never have to spend more than 45 minutes in traffic.


Lol dude, 45 minutes in traffic is doable, but it's only braggable to your CA city friends.

I've heard amazing things about Phoenix, ive considered it myself. My LA friends, as well as some older rich playa types in Chicago describe Scottsdale women as the hottest in the states. My personal opinion is San Diego has the most beautiful women.

The forum needs your input on this pressing matter
46   Malcolm   ignore (1)   2019 Mar 8, 9:43am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

So sorry it didn't work out for you, here. That is a beautiful picture. Good luck to you.
47   socal2   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 8, 9:46am   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

CBOEtrader says
Tbf, Indiana is as boring as a state can get. Low cost of living though sure. You can pick up a corn field farmhouse for peanuts


It's not that bad. Indiana is no more boring than Illinois, Ohio, Michigan or any other flat Midwest state. But Indiana doesn't have a fraction of the political dysfunction of Illinois and Michigan and the people are great.

I grew up in this town. It got way better after I moved away 25 years ago.

*The Best Place to Live in America Is a City You've Never Heard Of*
https://www.townandcountrymag.com/leisure/a9280984/best-place-to-live-in-america/
48   exfatguy   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 8, 9:50am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I enjoy California, and have done reasonably well here in my career, but if I ever want to own a home I'm proud of, it will have to be out of state. I was born in PA and lived there a number of years, so it beckons me even despite the sometimes harsh winters and humid summers, but in many ways it's home. And I could get 10X the house there for the price of a down payment on a crappy home in the Bay Area.
49   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 8, 11:05am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Tarantula says
Does Section 8 housing and other government assistance to Arizona?


Section 8 is a HUD program, did you really not know that? And as housing is one of the biggest expenses in California, me moving would make a lot less since if I still had section 8. You should think through your questions a little more...
50   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 8, 11:10am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

CBOEtrader says
The forum needs your input on this pressing matter


I'm married, and as I'm currently out here alone, have spent most of my time working or unpacking, or talking with my family back in SD where my daughters are finishing out their school year. So not much help there.

What I can tell you is 45 min for a 4 mile longer commute that was also 45 min in SD is great. So I drive farther, but there's less traffic. The stores out here also seem bigger, and less crowded. I can always find parking out front, and don't feel like I have someone on top of my all the time while shopping. I'm starting to re-think moving out of the city eventually. I got used to a lot of awful stress with the crowds in SD, and I'm just now realizing it.
51   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 8, 11:13am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

socal2 says
It's not that bad. Indiana is no more boring than Illinois, Ohio, Michigan or any other flat Midwest state. But Indiana doesn't have a fraction of the political dysfunction of Illinois and Michigan and the people are great.


I take exception to that. Michigan is not the Midwest. Between all the trees and the lake effect weather, it's very different from Indiana(where I've also lived). We lived on the West side of Michigan(Muskegon, Grand Rapids), and between hunting, fishing, the Lakes, and the outdoor beauty it's far from boring.
52   socal2   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 8, 11:26am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
I take exception to that. Michigan is not the Midwest. Between all the trees and the lake effect weather, it's very different from Indiana(where I've also lived). We lived on the West side of Michigan(Muskegon, Grand Rapids), and between hunting, fishing, the Lakes, and the outdoor beauty it's far from boring.


Yes - all that lake effect snow in the winter and mosquitoes and humidity in the summer time are not boring.

For me, the neatest thing about the West Coast is all of the hills and mountains. Whereas, most of the Midwest is as flat as a pancake thanks to the glaciers receding and scraping the land flat ultimately becoming the great lakes.
53   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 11:26am   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

exfatguy - beware the property/school taxes in Pennsylvania, Ohio as well.

Considered going back to PA after a work deployment there in the 90s but the school boards are out of control with the taxes, plus no exemptions like homestead, veterans, over 65 etc.

Alleghany County (Pittsburgh) is really screwing over the homeowners, same with sections of Blair County (Hollidaysburg, Altoona etc.) suspect many other regions / counties in the state having similar problems.

Ohio - same shit.
54   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 11:32am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Beware of Michigan as well. Taxes, utility rates - I'll stop there.

Born and raised in Michigan - nice place to visit in say August - between Mosquito/Deer Fly Season and Never Ending Winter Season

Opted for one of those "boring" places myself that are mentioned in the comments.

Only regret about leaving California is that it did not happen sooner.
55   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 8, 11:58am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

socal2 says
Yes - all that lake effect snow in the winter and mosquitoes and humidity in the summer time are not boring.


Lake effect snow is AWESOME! It got me out of school at least a few days a year, and makes for great sledding. Compare that to ice storms in the Midwest coupled with below zero temps, several degrees below zero wind temperatures, and the moderate Michigan winter kicks ass. Same for summer. The Lakes prevent the 100% humidity that blankets the Midwest.

Did you ever actually live in Michigan?
56   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 8, 12:00pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Kakistocracy says
Beware of Michigan as well. Taxes, utility rates - I'll stop there.

Born and raised in Michigan - nice place to visit in say August - between Mosquito/Deer Fly Season and Never Ending Winter Season


I did look at Michigan as the COL is among lowest in the country, but pay is also very low.

What's all this mention of mosquitoes? We lived on a lake for four years, and I don't remember having any crazy mosquito problems.
57   socal2   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 8, 12:04pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
Did you ever actually live in Michigan?


No, I lived in Chicago and Indianapolis. But all of my relatives live in Michigan (both of my parents grew up there too) and I have visited hundreds of times during all seasons. We had a good family reunion a few years ago in July in South Haven. I remember thinking, this place it pretty nice I could live here. Then I see pictures like this and quickly snap back to sanity.

58   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 12:06pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
Lake effect snow is AWESOME!


No - it is boring, depressive and a pain in the ass to deal with. Overcast constantly - a day with sunshine is a rare commodity. Big pain in the ass

NuttBoxer says
Did you ever actually live in Michigan?


I'll see your 4 years and raise you 20

Wish I didn't but unfortunately had no choice in the matter until I got old enough and had the means to get the fuck out.

1951 - 1971, Keweenaw Pennisula. Winter runs from October to end of April, in a good year it starts in September and last until mid May

Technical residence for mailing and tax purposes from 1975 thru spring of 1979 combined with obligatory visits to see the family

NuttBoxer says
We lived on a lake for four years, and I don't remember having any crazy mosquito problems.


Wind/breezes off the lake do nothing for Deer Flies, plus those suckers can break skin right through a sweatshirt . Mosquitos will appear like magic as soon as you get a few feet into the woods.

Go into the woods in May and June become a moving smorgasbord
59   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 12:07pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
I did look at Michigan as the COL is among lowest in the country, but pay is also very low.


Look at the property taxes and then the utility rates, the Marquette area is a great example of not being able to afford the electricity, double that if on the UPPCO system.
60   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 12:15pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
The Lakes prevent the 100% humidity that blankets the Midwest


Not spent any time in Lorain, Cleveland, Gary, Chicago now huh ?

Real gems round about late August early September - almost like New Orleans while the stupid lasts and Lake Erie and Ontario are worst.

Southern Lake Michigan comes in third.
61   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 12:32pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

@NuttBoxer

Before asking here are my post Michigan travels and places of residence/work.

New York City & Long Island 1971 - 1975

Great Lakes / St. Lawrence Seaway 1975 - 1979

Louisiana 1979 - 1990: Bought and Sold Two Houses

South Central Pennsylvania 1990 - 1995: Bought and Sold Two Houses

California 1995 - 2014: Bought 1995, Sold Spring of 2006 - then rented. Neighbors thought I was crazy when I sold because prices only go up

Present Location 2014 - to now: Bought August of 2014
62   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 8, 12:44pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Kakistocracy says
No - it is boring, depressive and a pain in the ass to deal with. Overcast constantly - a day with sunshine is a rare commodity. Big pain in the ass


You're conflating two things, the dense snowfall, and the clouds. I guess the snow wouldn't be as fun if I still lived there, my memories are as a kid in junior high/high school.

Kakistocracy says
Wind/breezes off the lake do nothing for Deer Flies, plus those suckers can break skin right through a sweatshirt . Mosquitos will appear like magic as soon as you get a few feet into the woods.

Go into the woods in May and June become a moving smorgasbord


I do remember deer flies. But I didn't hunt, guessing that's why I don't remember mosquitoes being bad. Lived there 7 years altogether, a few years in Grand Rapids as a kid.
63   Tenpoundbass   ignore (15)   2019 Mar 8, 12:48pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Even the sky is rainbow gay.
64   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 8, 1:14pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
You're conflating two things, the dense snowfall, and the clouds.


Can not have one without the other and the prevailing wind like most places is from the west/northwest so even if it is not snowing, the clouds are forming and blowing across Lake Superior picking up more moisture and even it is does get frozen over - you still get the damn constant overcast.

Younger people are not as prone to getting into the gloom/depression but the shit gets to people after awhile - just like the Northwest. Grey skies and more grey skies.

The lake is still warmer even at 30 some degrees then the air temperature - great for making clouds/snow.

The Lower Peninsula is not as bad by any means unless you get up into the Traverse City area northward to the straits.

Grand Rapids etc. is like going to the deep south in April onwards compared to the Upper Peninsula. Spring arrives weeks ahead of the U.P. - short sleeve shirt weather there while up north still Puffer Jacket season.
65   FortWayneIndiana   ignore (4)   2019 Mar 8, 3:39pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Yeah I know.

I like that sort of thing. But kids would probably never visit. Young people don’t like that sort of life much.

CBOEtrader says
FortWayneIndiana says
Was thinking of going back to Indiana, but couldn't convince the Mrs.


Tbf, Indiana is as boring as a state can get. Low cost of living though sure. You can pick up a corn field farmhouse for peanuts
66   BayArea   ignore (1)   2019 Mar 9, 9:45pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
I accepted a job in Phoenix, partly for the 30% decrease in cost-of-living, partly to stay within a drive-able distance of friends and relatives in San Diego.

Debt is Slavery!



30% decrease? Did you live in Bakersfield or Fresno?
67   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 11, 10:06pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Kakistocracy says
Younger people are not as prone to getting into the gloom/depression but the shit gets to people after awhile - just like the Northwest. Grey skies and more grey skies.


I do remember the clouds getting to me, even as a kid. Still love Michigan as a great place to live, at least the areas I lived in.
68   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 11, 10:22pm   ↑ like (5)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Tarantula says
My apologies, I'm clearly not as well versed in the various forms and sources of welfare as are you ;)


Too bad, you could have gotten something for your taxes besides a dick up your ass.

Tarantula says
I'm curious how an astute and boot-strapping right-wing Trump supporting conservative


.. But you are educated in the adult WWF, false dichotomy, hate anyone who doesn't agree with you propaganda. Trump is a warmongering, Wall Street insider who was smart enough to see an angle into the White House. Obama was warmongering Wall Street insider who did the same. You, are an ignorant bigot who has wasted his life defending one, and hating the other, but they both took turns fucking you.

Tarantula says
Personally, I'd be embarrassed and ashamed to be on welfare.


Bullshit. Someone as low-brow as you has no shame. Or maybe you do? You don't post under your original account here anymore, I wonder why not..?

Pussy.
69   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Mar 11, 10:23pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

BayArea says
30% decrease? Did you live in Bakersfield or Fresno?


San Diego
70   just_dregalicious   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 11, 10:29pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Appreciate the story NuttBoxer keep it up!
71   just_dregalicious   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 11, 10:30pm   ↑ like (0)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
. But you are educated in the adult WWF, false dichotomy, hate anyone who doesn't agree with you propaganda. Trump is a warmongering, Wall Street insider who was smart enough to see an angle into the White House. Obama was warmongering Wall Street insider who did the same. You, are an ignorant bigot who has wasted his life defending one, and hating the other, but they both took turns fucking you.


Man, that was like a downgrade of his entire family!
72   joshuatrio   ignore (0)   2019 Mar 12, 4:29am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

MrMagic says

I believe he's outside of Atlanta, GA

Down with the Rednecks. Talk about a culture shock when leaving CA, right?


The biggest culture shock was the workplace. People actually speak their mind down here without caring about stepping on someone else's toes. It's nice.

The other thing, people down here joke about skin color (my co-workers are about 50% black, 10% latino). Reality is, no one really cares what color you are - just the media - who try to race bait everyone.
73   Goran_K   ignore (3)   2019 Mar 12, 6:08am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

joshuatrio says
MrMagic says

I believe he's outside of Atlanta, GA

Down with the Rednecks. Talk about a culture shock when leaving CA, right?


The biggest culture shock was the workplace. People actually speak their mind down here without caring about stepping on someone else's toes. It's nice.

The other thing, people down here joke about skin color (my co-workers are about 50% black, 10% latino). Reality is, no one really cares what color you are - just the media - who try to race bait everyone.


Democrats have nothing to offer besides genitals and melanin. Anytime they try to debate on policy, you get AOC type suggestions and everyone cringes or laughs.
74   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Mar 12, 6:33am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

joshuatrio says
no one really cares what color you are


Au Contraire - one of many similar comments personally heard while facilitating training sessions in the greater Conyers area

I might have to work with "them" but I don't have to break bread with "them"

I might have to be nice to "them" at work but I don't have to spend time with "them" outside of work

The Old South has not died - it is just better hidden from view most of the time
75   anonymous   ignore (null)   2019 Apr 1, 6:07pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (1)   quote   flag        

Americans are relocating more frequently than before, here's why. On average, 47 million U.S. residents moved each year from 2012 through 2016

As the housing market continues to slow down across the country, many homeowners are relocating to housing markets that better suit their financial needs.

In fact, according to NerdWallet’s Home Buyer Survey an average 47 million U.S. residents moved each year from 2012 to 2016.

And among the 25 metros analyzed in the report, all but Chicago and New York posted a net resident increase from migration.

“There are a lot of factors to consider when trying to understand why people move to a new city, and why some from abroad look to make the United States their new home,” NerdWallet Expert Holden Lewis said. “While some of those reasons might seem obvious, like a lower cost of living or relocation for a new job, some factors may be less tied to finances, like wanting to live closer to family or in a more culturally diverse city.”

That being said, NerdWallet’s report indicates the most common factor behind homeowner migration is the request of a housing upgrade.

“More than one-third of people who had recently moved said they wanted a larger or better-quality home, according to the 2017 American Housing Survey by the Census Bureau,” NerdWallet writes. “Such upgrades don’t typically require big moves — heading down the street or into another neighborhood is often enough. But some may seek more dramatic changes and move to another state.”

For those migrating out of state, NerdWallet’s data points to affordability as the second biggest motivation for relocation.

“Even though upgrading is the most common reason people move, according to the American Housing Survey, 18% of recent movers say they left their prior residence to reduce housing costs,” NerdWallet writes.

So, what markets are these homeowners relocating to? Well, according to the analysis, Tampa and Phoenix.

These housing markets had the highest share of out-of-state new homeowners, sitting at a whopping 41%. This total even exceeds the national average of 32%.

“Often the cities that attract the most newcomers are the same places where people are forced to compete for living space,” Lewis said. “In these growing metros, if construction of affordable housing doesn’t keep pace with population growth, then rents and home prices will rise.”

And Lewis is right, as Nerdwallet revealed homeownership costs have priced out many of out-of-state newcomers, resulting in 68% settling into their new housing markets as renters.

NOTE: NerdWallet’s Home Buyer survey is based on data collected from The Harris Poll, which features the responses of 2,029 U.S. adults ranging from January 16th through 18th.

https://www.housingwire.com/articles/48687-americans-are-relocating-more-frequently-than-before-heres-why
76   everything   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 3, 1:26pm   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

I look at what happens to some of the old people.. They end up kicked into assisted living, etc. by family & company, etc. Thus, I continually downsize out of bigger into smaller places that fit my needs. Retirement communities are expanding is my guess.

Personally I'd rather migrate right the hell out of here to a country where people are valued.
77   Ceffer   ignore (1)   2019 Apr 3, 1:40pm   ↑ like (2)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Some people just move because they are chronically agitated and annoyed where they already live and think that the 'adventure' of moving will change things, until they become agitated and annoyed in their new environment.
78   NuttBoxer   ignore (2)   2019 Apr 4, 8:40am   ↑ like (10)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

After about a month here I've already decided I'm never going back. The one thing I didn't account for here is how much less stressful life is. When I go to the store, I don't have people constantly on top of me. There's more parking. The commute is at least five miles further than what I had in San Diego, but it takes me the same amount of time. My neighborhood is super quite, everyone is friendly, I have a yard, at least 500 more square feet, two car garage, and a pool for $300 less a month than what I paid for a 2/2 condo. And I can realistically buy a house here without going into debt for the rest of my life.

Oh yeah, and I already got my daughter into a charter that is VASTLY superior to the one she attends in San Diego.

Those people you talk about don't come from California. Californians have legitimate reason to leave.
79   joshuatrio   ignore (0)   2019 Apr 4, 8:49am   ↑ like (3)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

NuttBoxer says
 

After about a month here I've already decided I'm never going back. The one thing I didn't account for here is how much less stressful life is. When I go to the store, I don't have people constantly on top of me. There's more parking. The commute is at least five miles further than what I had in San Diego, but it takes me the same amount of time. My neighborhood is super quite, everyone is friendly, I have a yard, at least 500 more square feet, two car garage, and a pool for $300 less a month than what I paid for a 2/2 condo. And I can realistically buy a house here without going into debt for the rest of my life.


Sounds pretty identical to our story.

Glad the move has worked out for you guys!
80   FortWayneIndiana   ignore (4)   2019 Apr 4, 8:51am   ↑ like (1)   ↓ dislike (0)   quote   flag        

Are you in Texas?

NuttBoxer says
After about a month here I've already decided I'm never going back. The one thing I didn't account for here is how much less stressful life is. When I go to the store, I don't have people constantly on top of me. There's more parking. The commute is at least five miles further than what I had in San Diego, but it takes me the same amount of time. My neighborhood is super quite, everyone is friendly, I have a yard, at least 500 more square feet, two car garage, and a pool for $300 less a month than what I paid for a 2/2 condo. And I can realistically buy a house here without going into debt for the rest of my life.

Oh yeah, and I already got my daughter into a charter that is VASTLY superior to the one she attends in San Diego.

Those people you talk about don't come from California. Californians have legitimate reason to leave.

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